Aug 16

In recent months, there has been an increase in the discussions of the high rates of substance abuse and mental health issues burdening lawyers, rates much higher than the general population. A recent study has confirmed what many of us have known for many years, that lawyers are at greater risk of alcohol abuse, depression, anxiety, and stress due to the unique factors found working in the legal field. Now, in addition to the important conversations occurring across the country, the ABA has published a press release on a new comprehensive report from the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being that offers practical recommendations. No matter what area or institution of law you work in, this report offers recommendations that promote lawyer and law student well-being.

 

Shawn Healy, PhD

 

Aug 09

Given the prevalence of alcohol abuse and the opioid epidemic across the US, it is probably safe to say that everyone either knows of someone or has heard of someone in the media who has suffered from substance abuse. Some of these stories do not strike us as surprising because they fit our stereotypes of what a substance abuser looks like. We are usually not taken off guard by stories of wealthy, bored celebrities living a party lifestyle eventually entering rehab for a substance abuse problem or hearing about the high rates of drug abuse among homeless individuals (assuming that those examples reflect stereotypes you hold). Continue reading »

Jul 06

It’s annoying, isn’t it, how the news (and not only in the popular press) about how to stay healthy keeps changing?  Some years ago, we began to hear reports that consuming alcohol (sometimes it was red wine, sometimes alcohol in general) was associated with living longer, or at least with less or later death from coronary disease and other things.  That was a little disconcerting to many nondrinkers (those in recovery and also some of the many Americans who abstain for other reasons), and some even wondered whether it was their medical duty to manage a drink or two a day.  (No studies ever suggested that heavy drinking was good for you.) Continue reading »

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