Oct 21

Many times throughout the day, I make an automatic comparison of my present situation to a desired future outcome. Perhaps at the start of my day I have not written a new blog post and I want to have written a post by the end of the day. This makes me aware of what I want to accomplish, keeps me striving toward goals, and helps me to know if I am progressing toward those goals or getting further away from them. This, in and of itself, does not seem like a negative exercise. However, the words that I choose to use have quite an impact on whether I feel encouraged about my goals for the day or weighed down by the lack of progress. Continue reading »

Sep 09

Many lawyers and law students have learned early on that the world of law is often a harsh world, filled with conflicts and high-levels of stress. Whether it is direct disagreements, criticisms, or perceived attempts to manipulate, interactions between lawyers can often feel contentious and many individuals react defensively to protect themselves.  Many individuals find it difficult to separate the professional activities from the personal feelings which result from being criticized, or disagreed with.  However, an attorney’s job is to be objective and realize that these interactions are not personal attacks.  If you find that you overly personalize your work, then you need to find a way to step-back to an objective view to better serve the client and to have less high-level stress.  Is it possible? In short, yes. Continue reading »

Sep 02

I have been riding motorcycles for many years now. And in addition to it being an amazing activity (I understand I am biased), riding motorcycles has been very informative in terms of how to approach fear in my general life. But before I get into that, I have to give a little informational background on how motorcycles work.

As you know, motorcycles are two-wheeled motorized vehicles, which means that they are influenced by gyroscopic forces that help the motorcycle stay upright when it is traveling forward (above 5 miles an hour). Now the forward momentum (and gyroscopic forces) of the motorcycle maintains its balance and direction. In order to change directions while moving (steering), the motorcycle has to be tipped over in a controlled fashion. The way you tip over a motorcycle in motion is to turn the front wheel in the opposite direction that you want to go. Turning the front wheel to the left will start to tip the motorcycle over to the right, and hence change directions to the right. Continue reading »

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