Aug 16

In recent months, there has been an increase in the discussions of the high rates of substance abuse and mental health issues burdening lawyers, rates much higher than the general population. A recent study has confirmed what many of us have known for many years, that lawyers are at greater risk of alcohol abuse, depression, anxiety, and stress due to the unique factors found working in the legal field. Now, in addition to the important conversations occurring across the country, the ABA has published a press release on a new comprehensive report from the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being that offers practical recommendations. No matter what area or institution of law you work in, this report offers recommendations that promote lawyer and law student well-being.

 

Shawn Healy, PhD

 

Jul 25

We all have times in our lives when things feel chaotic; when it feels like everything that is important in our lives is outside of our control and we cannot improve our plight. The typical reaction to this situation is to exert more effort directed at changing things that are outside of our control, followed by an increase in our stress. Obviously, this is an ineffective strategy, yet it is one that we almost instinctively attempt. So instead of running on that hamster wheel, what else can you do? Continue reading »

Jul 14

Among the numerous factors that seem to contribute to the greatly amplified rate of depression among lawyers is the fact that the sense of mission, of using a law degree to make a positive contribution to the world, which motivation many people to go to law school, can evaporate in the context of real-world ways to make a living and repay those humongous student loans.  Some studies suggest that those lawyers whose work lives focus on doing good for society (typically lower paid jobs) are actually in better moods. Continue reading »

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