Sep 27

 

LCL attends Harvard Wellness Fair

I was pleased during my recent visit to Harvard Law School Wellness Fair to be able to speak with so many students about how Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers (“LCL”) exists to help lawyers, judges and law students.  Although many students were not aware of LCL and its mission, they were certainly attentive when I explained the services provided by LCL.  As can be found at the students’ tab, LCL is here to help students learn to cope with common issues like stress and procrastination, and successfully overcome more difficult issues such as mental health issues, substance abuse or alcoholism.  LCL’s clinicians are experienced and helpful, and our recovery meetings are welcoming to law students.  Moreover, Harvard Law students need not travel far for a recovery meeting, because there is a LCL recovery meeting at the law school.  In addition to LCL resources, Harvard Law School also provides helpful information at its HLS Wellness blog

I not only enjoyed meeting with the law students, but I also had the pleasure of meeting a fascinating individual traveling through life.  Samuel Jay Keyser, Professor of Linguistics (Emeritus), took the time, as he strolled towards his office at MIT, took time to stop and chat.  He was also kind enough to introduce me to his blog, The Reluctant Traveler.  Included in his wide ranging discussions about travel, are two posts pertinent to Harvard Law School, justice and judgment, My Favorite Spot.  Thank you, John Safer and the related Releasing the Sword in the Stone, September 15, 2013 Not surprisingly, given Professor Keyser’s profession, the posts were educational and thoughtful in discussing issues of justice and judgment.  For me, however, the power of the posts was that his discussion would not have been possible but for the author’s willingness to slow down, to contemplate that which was about him, to allow curiosity room to explore, and to give himself time to understand.  As a result, blobs became objects from which lessons could be learned.  Go ahead, slow down and read Professor Keyser’s posts.     

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